Archive for March, 2011


The online news story that I chose to write about for this blog post was found that I found on the New York Times website.  The article is entitled ‘Libyan Rebels March Toward Qaddafi Stronghold.’  The article is about the rebellion taking place in the African country of Libya.

In my opinion, this online news article is a strong one because of the fact that it is about a very important issue taking place in the world that people should be following and paying attention too.  The visual elements of this story ad an element of furthuring the information and giving the reader a broader sense of what is going on with the situation in Libya.  The photo gallery located on the left hand side of the new article shows the readers different photos telling different aspects of the story.  One of the pictures in the gallery also directs readers to another photo gallery showing photos from the beginning of the protests until the current state that they are in now.

It is my opinion that the story was told very effectively in the way and format that it is currently in in the link that I have provided above.  This example of this news story actually is one of the better ones that I have seen regarding this current issue in Libya.  Some of the other stories have multiple photos that go along with them, however, this is the only one that I have seen that links you to another photo gallery showing pictures from the course of the protests taking place, starting at the beginning and leading up to the most recent pictures taken.

For example, one of the pictures in the photo gallery, which contains 93 pictures, is the same picture that is used as the main picture of the article.  The picture shows a man wearing a form of camoflauge, holding what appears to be an AK-47 assault rifle.  The fact that this image shows a man, who doesn’t appear to be any form of police/law enforcement or government official and is allowed to walk the streets with a deadly weapon such as a gun used in military battle scares me.

Another picture in the photo gallery that helps portray the seriousness of the situation taking place in Libya is one that occurs a few pictures after the one I have previously mentioned.  This image shows three men standing on top of a military tank holding a large flag.  This picture shows to me the different sides of the story and how it is affecting the citizens of Libya.

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Consumers base their car-purchasing decisions based on the price of gas.

The trend of people downsizing vehicles they own maybe be repeating itself.  This trend began in 2008 when the price of gas skyrocketed.

Bob Anderson, a Luther Mankato Honda sales consultant has seen this first hand.  “When gas prices go up, the focus goes to vehicles that get high gas mileage,” but the opposite is also true; when gas prices are lower, people tend to buy bigger cars with lower gas mileage.

When gas prices fell from $4 to $3 a gallon in 2008, Anderson said that the demand for larger vehicles rose accordingly.

Last week in Mankato, gasoline was at about #3.60 per gallon, but that might change in a very short time.  The U.S. Energy Information Administration said there is a 25 percent chance that by summer, gas prices will have surpassed $4 a gallon.

This report, was released just 24 hours after oil prices hit their highest point in over two years.

Pat Adams, a sales manager at Mankato Motor Co. says that he hasn’t noticed as big of a customer push toward better mileage cars as he did in 2008.  Adams thinks that the reason for this is because, now, people may be better prepared for higher gas prices.

Ben Heintz of Heintz Toyota agrees with Adams.  Heintz seems to think that purchasing choices will continue to follow what is expected of them as long as gas prices hold steady at where they are now. “Gas isn’t high-enough-priced yet, but once it reaches $4, then people will get a little goofy and panic a bit.  Four dollar to $5 gas has a lot of people concerned.”

Aside from people being concerned about fuel prices, companies show concern as well.  Volk Transfer of Mankato, a company that uses fuel in mass quantities, logs more than one million miles of driving a year.

Jane Goettl, the human resources and safety manager for Volk Transfer, said the company has taken measures in order to monitor its fuel expenses.  These measures include fuel-conservation incentives for drivers as well as lowering it’s trucks top speed to 68 mph, down from 74.

In the meantime, car dealers say the sale of four-cylinder and hybrid vehicles continue to move off of dealer lots at close to the same pace as they did  in 2008 when fuel prices rose dramatically.

A recent survey conducted by Kelley Blue Book, a reference guide for vehicle values and pricing, showed that four our of five consumers say that their car choices are influence by gas prices.

However because large trucks and SUVs are required for work purposes and people who spend a lot of time outdoors, there is still a reoccurring demand for them.

Meredith Frank of New Ulm doesn’t find the price of gases to her liking.  For the past four years, she has commuted to her job in Mankato.  “It’s getting old,” she said.  The SUV she drives costs around $70 to fill up.

Frank said that having a more-fuel efficient vehicle would be nice but she feels her four-wheel drive SUV ensures her safety in the snowy winters.

 

Keywords:  Gas Prices, Mankato, Mankato Motor Co.

Who is the editor in chief?

The editor in chief of the MSU Reporter is Nate Brennan.  Brennan graduated from Herrin High School in Southern Illinois.  After high school, Brennan moved to Minnesota to attend MSU.  Brennan says that while editor in chief of the Reporter, his goals include bringing readers entertaining features such as web-only video, audio and print content such as podcasts.  He also wants to tell stories of outstandind students, faculty, and alumni as well as establish a better relationship between MSU and the city of Mankato.

Editor Board 2010-2011

What is the MSU Reporter?

The MSU reporter is a student-ran newspaper that represents Minnesota State University, Mankato.  The MSU Reporter was originally titled the College Reporter and has been one of the big things on campus since 1928.

What is it?

When is it published?

Today, the reporter is published every Tuesday and Thursday.  An online version is also available during the academic year.

Publication Information

Who is responsible for the MSU Reporter?

The paper is student-operated.  The Reporter provides the Mankato community with the area’s most complete source of campus news, sports and entertainment as well as state, national and world news.

Who is behind it?

How do I subscribed to the MSU Reporter?

The MSU Reporter is available to MSU students for free and is located in 12 locations across campus. The Reporter has a weekly circulation of 12,000 copies: 6,000 for Tuesday issue and 6,000 for Thursday issue.  For those that aren’t MSU students and don’t get the paper free, they can subscribe to the Reporter call (507) 389-1926. Subscriptions for the academic school year are $45.00 and subscribers will receive the paper within three to five days after publishing.

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Minnesota food shelves face difficulties in keeping up with the high amount of hungry residents.

 

Since 2000, food shelf usage across the state of Minnesota has tripled to more than 3 million visits annually.

According to the Minnesota FoodShare campaign, food shelf visits in Minnesota increased by 25 percent between 2008 and 2009, the largest  in 28 years.   Food shelf usage also increased 14 percent on average across Minnesota in 2010.  Some food shelves in the Twin Cities saw as much as a 60 percent increase.

It is estimated that 14 percent, or about 723,000 Minnesotans, do not have enough food.

Beginning in 1982, the Minnesota FoodShare March Campaign aims to do all they can to help hungry Minnesotans.The annual campaign, has a goal of raising a combined 12 million dollars and pounds of food.

Once this goal of 12 million combined pounds and dollars is met, it will help restock food shelves across the state, including close to two dozen in Central Minnesota.

Several things, like food drives and monetary donations, can be done to help the situation improve.

Those participating in the Minnesota FoodShare program, report their totals once a week throughout the month of March, with final donation totals being due the first week of April.

 

Keywords: Minnesota Foodshare, Twin Cities, Minnesota

MSU Reporter FAQ

MSU Reporter Frequently Asked Questions

Who is the Editor in Chief?

A resident of Southern Illinois and graduate of Herrin High School, Nate Brennan relocated to Mankato, Minn. to attend Minnesota State University, where his father, Paul, is a professor of accounting in the business department.  Brennan’s goals for the paper during his tenure as editor-in-chief include bringing readers entertaining features such as web-only video, audio and print content such as podcasts and artists series, and telling stories of outstanding and interesting students, faculty and alumni and cultivating a better community between MSU and the city of Mankato.

Editor Board 2010-2011

What is the MSU Reporter?

The MSU Reporter is the student-run newspaper that represents Minnesota State University, Mankato. Originally titled The College Reporter when the university was Minnesota State Teachers’ College, the Reporter has been a fixture on campus an in the Mankato community since 1928.

What it is.

When it published?

Today’s Reporter is published in print on Tuesday and Thursday, in addition to an online version, during the academic year.

Publication Information

Who is behind the MSU Reporter?

The paper is student-operated and generates 83 percent of its operating budget. The Reporter is instrumental in providing the Minnesota State University, Mankato community with the area’s most comprehensive source of campus news, sports and entertainment as well as state, national and world news.

Who is behind it?

Has the paper received any awards?

The Reporter is consistently producing award-winning editorial and advertising content.

In 2010, the Reporter earned the Minnesota Newspaper Association’s General Advertising Excellence award for the tenth straight year among college newspapers. In addition, the last few years our editorial staff has helped us to earn the following honors:

• Associated Collegiate Press, Best of Show, 2010, 10th Place

• Society of Profesional Journalists, Mark of Excellence Award, 2008, Region 8, 2nd Place

• Associated Collegiate Press, Newspaper of the Year, 2006, 3rd Place

Awards

How do i subscribe to the MSU Reporter?

To subscribe to the Reporter call (507) 389-1926. Subscriptions for the academic school year are $45.00 and subscribers will receive the paper within three to five days after publishing. If you already have a subscription and there is a delivery problem, please call (507) 389-1926.

However, The Reporter has a weekly circulation of 12,000 copies: 6,000 for Tuesday issue and 6,000 for Thursday issue. Additionally, the Reporter is distributed free-of-charge to 20 locations across the MSU campus and an additional 12 locations around the community.

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